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Apr

16

Are you aware of the legal changes this year that WILL affect your business?

  • Flexible working
  • Shared parental leave
  • Changes to national minimum wage
  • TUPE changes
  • New financial penalties for employers
  • The latest case law on holiday pay and commission

 

If you need a refresher or an update in this area then come along to our essential update on Employment Law hosted by one of our Senior Employment Law Consultants.

We will provide you with guidance on how to remain compliant and manage your staff, leaving you to focus on running your business.

The event will take place on Thursday 7th May 2015 between 8.30am and 10.30am at the Warrington Village Hotel

Places are filling up fast so if you'd like to reserve your place please email info@opsium.co.uk or call us on 0161 603 2156.


Posted by: Grahame Davies
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Apr

16

6th April increases

The limit for a week's pay when calculating redundancy pay increased to £475.

Statutory pay for maternity, paternity, adoption and shared parental leave increased to £139.58 per week.

Statutory sick pay (SSP) rate increased to £88.45 per week.


Posted by: Alan Mills
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Apr

16

Holiday Pay - the final position?

The calculation of holiday pay has been in the news for some time.  However you may have missed that just before Easter a judgement was issued in the UK on the case of Lock v British Gas, which serves to confirm what was becoming increasing apparent

The background to this case is that Mr Locke was a salesman whose income was made up of approximately 60% commission on sales.  When he was on holiday his income dropped as his holiday pay was calculated using his basic pay only.  The position now is that commission should be taken into account when calculating holdasy pay. This decision follow on from a Tribunal ruling last year on ‘non guaranteed overtime’, which also stated such payments would need to be taken into account when calculating holiday pay

The immediate concern for employees is the issue of potential back pay claims. The government has introduced the Deduction from Wages (Limitation) Regulations 2014 which limit employers’ exposure to claims for backdated holiday pay to 2 years.  However this Regulation does not come into force until July 2015.

The key message to employers must be to review any additional payments being made to staff which are not included with the holiday pay calculation and consider what changes need to be made going forward. Employers are advised to contact Opsium for advice on how these decisions impact on your business and what changes need to be made to your current arrangements. 


Posted by: Grahame Davies
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Mar

06

Breakfast Seminar 26th March: Employment Law Update

Are you aware of the legal changes this year that WILL affect your business?

  • Flexible working
  • Shared parental leave
  • Changes to national minimum wage
  • TUPE changes
  • New financial penalties for employers
  • The latest case law on holiday pay and commission

 

If you need a refresher or an update in this area then come along to our essential update on Employment Law hosted by one of our Senior Employment Law Consultants.

We will provide you with guidance on how to remain compliant and manage your staff, leaving you to focus on running your business.

The event will take place on Thursday 26th March 2015 between 8.30am and 10.30am at the Bury Village Hotel, Waterfold Business Park, Rochdale Road, Bury, BL9 7BQ

Places are filling up fast so if you'd like to reserve your place please email info@opsium.co.uk or call Michael or Winston on 0161 603 2156.


Posted by: Opsium marketing
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Jan

30

Let it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it Snow

With temperatures plummeting and forecasters predicting more heavy snowfall, do you know what to do if employees fail to make it into work because of adverse weather?

From a legal point of view, you are within your rights to withhold the pay of an employee who cannot make it into work due to adverse weather. Employees have a contractual obligation to attend work, even if they cannot attend through no fault of their own. Providing that the office is still open, you therefore do not have to pay them.

However, you may want to consider alternative ways of dealing with this situation, particularly when considering the impact it may have on staff morale and productivity. If the business permits, it would be worth looking at the possibility of home-working. Where this is not an option, you may want to encourage employees to take the day(s) off as part of their annual leave entitlement or ask them to make the time back at a later date.

It is good practice to communicate in advance the company policy on adverse weather and advise whether employees will be paid for the days that they are unable to make it into work. It is also helpful to provide employees with the name of someone to contact in the event that they are ‘snowed in’. You need to manage the balance between encouraging employees to attend work without actually putting pressure on them to risk their safety. However, if you feel that an employee is using the weather as an excuse to stay at home you should make employees aware that a disciplinary may be used if you suspect they are taking advantage. 


Posted by: Grahame Davies
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